Oval Engagement Rings

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ONE-OF-A-KIND DESIGN

Oval


With some of the most recognizable young women in Hollywood proudly showing off their oval diamond engagement rings, it is no wonder that oval diamonds are becoming more and more sought after. With names such as Blake Lively, Katie Holmes, and Leann Rimes showcasing their beautiful oval diamonds recently, young women all around the world are now turning their focus to oval diamond engagement rings. Luckily, Janai Jewellery offers a huge range of unique options when it comes to crafting the perfect engagement ring for your beloved partner, and that includes the oval cut diamond. From a selection in ring designs, including solitaire, halo, and trilogy, with choices of platinum, white gold, and yellow gold, we know that you will find exactly the type of engagement ring you are looking for.

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Ethically-sourced,
GIA certified diamonds

Hand-crafted
in store

Creative and collaborative
design approach

Over 35 years industry
experience

Oval shaped diamond cut

Oval Diamonds

Created by Lazare Kaplan in the 1960’s, oval diamonds are a modified brilliant-cut (like virtually all round cuts). Because the two shapes possess a similar fire and brilliance, the oval is an ideal choice for a customer who likes the look of a round diamond, but wants something more unique. Oval diamonds have the added advantage of an elongated shape, which can create the illusion of greater size. The slender shape can also make the finger of the wearer appear longer and slimmer, an effect often desired.

Oval Diamond LW Ratios.

Preferences vary on how narrow or fat an oval cut diamond should be, so choose what appeals to you personally (though a length to width ratio of 1.35 – 1.50 is considered the classic oval cut). A slightly thinner cut may look most appealing in a setting where the diamond is flanked by side stones. Every Lumera Diamond includes precise measurements, as well as the length to width ratio, so you know the exact shape of the oval diamond you are considering.

Oval cut diamonds posses some degree of bow-tie, varying from near invisible to severe. The visibility of a bow-tie effect cannot be ascertained by reviewing the diamond certificate or dimensions, but only upon visual inspection. If you are interested in purchasing an oval diamond, but would like to have it inspected first, please contact a diamond consultant, who can review diamonds on your behalf. chat online, or email consultant@lumeradiamonds.com.

The chart below serves as a general guideline for evaluating the cut of an oval diamond.

Evaluating color in oval diamonds is subjective. Keep in mind that many buyers may actually prefer the ever so slightly warmer colors of a G-H diamond over the cool colorlessness of a D-F diamond. In fact, most of the premium in price associated with oval diamonds at the higher end of the color scale is driven by supply and demand; customers want the D-F color grades, and are willing to pay a premium to get them. In a world without diamond color grading, the price premium for higher grades would be much lower, as the actual differences in color are difficult to perceive. The color chart below provides a general guide for evaluating color in oval diamonds.

Like color, evaluating clarity in oval diamonds is subjective. GIA provides excellent help with their clarity grades. Still, it is important to understand that each customer will have a unique standard for clarity. Some may be perfectly comfortable with an inclusion as long as they cannot easily see it. Others may insist on a more technically flawless appearance. The clarity chart below provides a general guide for evaluating clarity in oval diamonds.

Oval Diamonds Appear Larger Than You’d Expect

When most of us think of diamond size, we envision the top surface of a round diamond. If you replaced that round diamond with an oval diamond that’s the same carat weight, the top surface would usually appear to be larger. This is because an oval diamond often has a greater surface area than a round diamond of the same weight. For example, an average 1 carat oval diamond has a 10% larger surface area than an average 1 carat round diamond. This means that you can get a diamond that looks larger, for a lower price.

Oval Diamond Engagement Rings Make The Fingers Look More Slender

Because an oval diamond is elongated, oval diamond engagement rings may give the illusion of slightly longer and more slender fingers. Whether this is a good thing or bad thing is a personal choice.

The Length to Width Ratio is Important

All oval diamonds in our diamond search engine will have a length to width ratio listed. This ratio will help you gauge how narrow or wide the diamond is. A greater length to width ratio means the diamond will be longer and skinnier, while a lower length to width ratio means the diamond is more circular (a round diamond has a length to width ratio of 1). Most people prefer oval diamonds with a length to width ratio from 1.3 to 1.7, however this is completely up to you. I personally prefer oval diamonds with a length to width ratio in the 1.4 to 1.6 range.

You Should Not Pay More for an Oval Diamond

While oval diamonds are more rare than round and princess-cut diamonds, they are also in less demand. You should not have to increase your budget when looking for oval diamond engagement rings.

Oval Diamond Engagement Rings are Very Sparkly

An oval diamond is cut the same way as a round diamond, and so even though a round diamond has the most brilliance of all diamond shapes, an oval diamond is very close. Oval diamond engagement rings are perfect for someone who likes the brilliance of a round diamond, but wants something more unique.

Warning: Oval diamonds are not graded by the GIA for cut. In order to end up with a beautiful oval diamond engagement ring, make sure your jeweler understands the optimum oval diamond cut specifications. The below table should help you narrow down your choices, but never buy an oval diamond based on the certificate only. You really need to find someone that will perform a visual inspection before you purchase the stone.

Optimum Table & Depth for Oval Diamonds

Ideal/Excellent Very Good
Table (%) 53 – 63 52-53 or 63-64.8
Depth (%) 57.5 – 62 56-57.4 or 62-65

 

You Can Get an Oval Moissanite or Oval Sapphire Engagement Ring
The oval shape is available in moissanite and gemstones, including sapphire. In fact, Kate Middleton’s engagement ring (that was originally Princess Diana’s) is a beautiful oval sapphire. Oval moissanite and oval sapphire are much more affordable than oval diamonds, and my post on affordable engagement rings cover these options in more detail. Contact us if you want to discuss these options.

Your Oval Diamond May Have a Bow-Tie Effect
Most oval diamonds have something called a bow-tie effect. This effect occurs when light doesn’t bounce back in the middle of the diamond because of the way the diamond is cut. While most diamond cutters agree that this is part of the beauty of the oval diamond, you do not want the bow-tie effect to be too severe. Because bow-tie effect isn’t taken into consideration when grading a diamond, it is not noted on a diamond certificate. The only way to gauge how severe a diamond’s bow-tie is is through visual inspection. Below is a picture from the visual inspection I performed before purchasing my fiance’s diamond. Her diamond has a small bow-tie in the middle, and I like this picture because the contrasting black background makes the bow-tie easy to see. This is the same diamond that’s pictured at the top of the blog post, where you can see that the bow-tie effect is fairly small and beautiful.

The oval cut is a rounded shape typically comprised of 58 facets with a typical ratio between 1.33 and 1.66.

This shape optimises carat weight, meaning that the drawn out and symmetrical shape can make it appear larger than round stones of a similar weight. The oval cut is also an ideal way to elongate shorter fingers and it has recently become fashionable to use as the centre stone for engagement rings.

A “bow-tie effect” occurs when light passing through the diamond casts a shadow across the central facets of the stone. This shadow can be reduced by altering the depth of the pavilion, and adjusting the angles of the table and facets to better diffuse light in the central area. This effect also occurs in the Pear, Marquise and Heart shapes.

2. Features

The oval cut is a rounded shape typically comprised of 58 facets with a typical ratio between 1.33 and 1.66.

This shape optimises carat weight, meaning that the drawn out and symmetrical shape can make it appear larger than round stones of a similar weight. The oval cut is also an ideal way to elongate shorter fingers and it has recently become fashionable to use as the centre stone for engagement rings.

A “bow-tie effect” occurs when light passing through the diamond casts a shadow across the central facets of the stone. This shadow can be reduced by altering the depth of the pavilion, and adjusting the angles of the table and facets to better diffuse light in the central area. This effect also occurs in the Pear, Marquise and Heart shapes.

3. Expert Advice
“Ratio is an important aspect to consider with the oval shape as it can have a significant impact on both the light dispersion within the stone and the appearance of the finger. When selecting an oval shape it is important to reconcile the relative benefits of the longer shape (larger ratio) and the more rounded shape (smaller ratio). The former will better elongate the finger, while a more rounded shape will better prevent the bow-tie effect.”

4. History & Background
Although oval shaped diamonds were first introduced over 200 years ago, the modern oval cut was invented in the early 1960s by leading Russian cutter Lazare Kaplan. The cut eventually earned him a place in the Jewellers International Hall of Fame, however, Kaplan also left his mark on the diamond industry with his unique ability to split a rough diamond into smaller stones with a single blow. This process is known as cleaving.

When a rough material is poorly shaped or contains defective flaws that prevent it from being turned into a single stone, it must be split along the grain. Kaplan became famous for his expertise in taking stones that were otherwise deemed unworthy and transforming them into beautifully cut diamonds.

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